Infographics–Improve Your Brand’s Visibility

To let know your audience that your product and services are existing is a little bit difficult task.
But when you share content like Infographics. It sends a direct message to them that the company and its services are available.
Consistency is the key. When you are using content marketing strategies for your brand growth. It takes time but the outcomes are very worthy.

 1, you should increase Brand Awareness

You should leverage Infographics designs for brand awareness. If you’re not leveraging it.

By creating Infographics with your brand identities such as brand color and logo, can help users to recognize your brand.

When users find Infographics appealing and informative, they share it with others very aggressively and in  that way content goes viral.

Mostly audience like to see visual and they can easily remember it for a long time. Infographics can help your brand to differentiate from your competitors.

As a user, we also use internet or social media and when we find something interesting and relevant content to us. We also share it with others. Even Hubspot reports shows, Infographics are shared 3x more than on social media as compared other visuals. To get maximum shares, create visual designs that are worth the effort.

2, Create Timelines

You can use Infographics to create a timeline of your business and its growth. They are best to show, from where to where your business or brand has reached. When the audience finds that content relevant to them. They more likely to share it with others and this will help you in the improvement of brand visibility.

During the process of  Infographicscreation. Always consider one thing in your mind that you’re making it more appealing, shareable and relevant.

We all know the basics of Content marketing that is Content is Kingand if you want to achieve your marketing goals, understand your user need.

When we talk about online marketing, Content creation is a very crucial part and we have to take it very carefully.

What Make China Restart Production Activities Easily

Industrial production does not take place in isolation, but rather relies on networks of suppliers, component manufacturers, distributors, government agencies, and customers who are all involved in the process of production through competition and cooperation. The business ecosystem in China has evolved quite a lot in the last 30 years.

China has a large number of dominant industries that create products and materials for export. The most prominent amongst the finished products exported from China are electrical goods, data processing technologies, clothing, and other textiles, and optical and medical equipment. China also has the world’s biggest new car market and exports a significant amount of raw materials, particularly steel. It’s the world’s largest exporter of steel. 

For example, Shenzhen, where ChinaDivision company is located, a city bordering Hong Kong in the southeast, has evolved as a hub for the electronics industry. It has cultivated an ecosystem to support the manufacturing supply chain, including component manufacturers, low-cost workers, a technical workforce, assembly suppliers, and customers.

The huge labor pool in China helps to produce in bulk, accommodate any seasonal industry requirement, and even cater to sudden rises in the demand schedule.

So, if readers were asking about, will the outbreak of virus destroy production in China, well the answer is not, but will be affected in a short term.

Assemble-to-order with Planned Orders

Assemble-to-order with planned orders is particularly useful:

If production control is managed using production orders (see Special Settings for Projects) but you do not want to create the production order along with the sales order. You can use the planned order to fine-tune planning and then convert it into a production order at a later date.
If production is controlled using Repetitive Manufacturing. The planned order is then the run schedule quantity which you can plan using the planning and control tools provided by Repetitive Manufacturing. In this procedure, the goods receipt for the material can also be posted with reference to the sales order number. Thus, the costs can also be directly assigned to the sales order even in Repetitive Manufacturing.
Assemble-to-order with Repetitive Manufacturing

Use assemble-to-order with Repetitive Manufacturing if several of the following points apply to your situation:

Production of the finished product is carried out in clear and simple steps.
The assembly is produced in a constant flow over the production lines.
Simple routings are used, or assembly can be carried out without routings.
The components can be staged anonymously at the production lines. The components are procured, for example, with KANBAN using consumption-based planning, or with the planning strategy “subassembly planning”.
You want to reduce the effort required for production control and backflushing.
Sample Scenario for Assemble-to-order with Repetitive Manufacturing

The production process is kept as simple as possible. There are only a limited number of production levels involved in producing the product. The number of components is relatively low, however, it is quite possible to produce a large number of finished products due to configuration options.
The components required for final assembly are selected via the configuration in the sales order and are staged at the production line anonymously. You can use the assembly order to carry out an availability check for the selected components. Components that are always readily available are excluded from the availability check by setting the appropriate indicator in the material master record. (order fulfillment center
The finished product is assembled without a routing and the operations are similar. The planning table in Repetitive Manufacturing provides the planner with an overview of the production rates. Here, the planner can also check capacities for the production lines and distribute the ordered quantities to the production lines with available capacity.
When production is complete, the goods receipt for the finished product is posted with reference to the sales order number – a special function exists in Repetitive Manufacturing for this. Once the goods receipt is posted, the goods are withdrawn for the specific sales order and the assembly order is deleted.
For the scenario described above, you can also work without using the planning functions of Repetitive Manufacturing. In this case, capacity planning is not carried out from the planning table in Repetitive Manufacturing, but instead, using the capacity leveling functions in capacity planning. However, you can still use the backflushing functions in Repetitive Manufacturing.